Skip to Content

NEO 2008

NEO: The Journey Begins

Willa McDonald

2008 Editor

About this issue

The topics explored in this first issue of NEO are wide-ranging, but some common themes emerge. Antje Gnida (Macquarie University), in her paper, " From Hun-Beast to Abstract Threat: Portrayals of the German Enemy in Australian War Posters ", examines the use of propaganda posters by the Australian Government in World Wars I and II and the way the powerful notion of an invasion threat by a brutal German enemy was used in the recruitment of servicemen and women.

Continuing the theme of propaganda, Pablo Leighton 
( Universidad de Santiago, Chile), in " Archives and Narratives for the Recent Coup-H istory of Chile ", investigates different narratives – official reports and unofficial reports from the social sciences – that describe the relationship between United States and Chile, in order to look at the 'covert action' program of media propaganda undertaken by the US Government against the Chilean leftist movement, from the mid-sixties and peaking at the 1973 coup crisis.

Celebrity is the theme underpinning the work of Rosemary Parsons in her paper " Becoming 'The IT Girl': Google Identity, Celebrity Culture and Contemporary Subjectivity ". Parsons (Department of Cultural Studies, Macquarie University), uses a new play by a NSW Central Coast theatre company to examine how the Internet (in particular, the concept of Google identity) and obsession with 'celebrity' impact upon contemporary understandings of subjectivity.

Noparat Tananuraksakul (Department of International Communication, Macquarie University), continues the theme of 'celebrity' with her discussion of the "Glocal Big Brother Phenomenon in Thailand" . This paper explores the first and second Big Brother Thailand series, focusing in particular on the way the programs were received and interpreted by local Thai audiences.

Jennifer Corkin (Department of Media) also tackled issues of 'celebrity' in her paper: " Meet The Burtons – The Celebrity Legacy of Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton", using the case study of the stars' scandalous affair during the filming of Cleopatra (1963) to investigate the role this legendary celebrity couple played in establishing the current nature of today's celebrity culture.

Diverging from the celebrity theme, Can T. Yalçinkaya (Department of Media, Macquarie University), looks at the popular Turkish music genre known as Arabesk in his paper " Turkish Arabesk Music and the Changing Perceptions of Melancholy in Turkish Society ". Yalçincaya explores the use of Arabesk – a musical synthesis of Turkish Classical, folk, Western pop and Egyptian bellydance music – as an articulation of a collective mode of melancholy in Turkish society.

Contents

Antje Gnida – "From Hun-Beast to Abstract Threat: Portrayals of the German Enemy in Australian War Posters"
(Department of Media, Macquarie University)

Pablo Leighton – "Archives and Narratives for the Recent Coup-H istory of Chile"
( Universidad de Santiago, Chile)

Rosemary Parsons – "Becoming 'The IT Girl': Google Identity, Celebrity Culture and Contemporary Subjectivity"
(Department of Cultural Studies, Macquarie University)

Noparat Tananuraksakul"'Glocal' Big Brother Phenomenon in Thailand"
(Department of International Communication, Macquarie University)

Can T. Yalçinkaya – "Turkish Arabesk Music and the Changing Perceptions of Melancholy in Turkish Society"
(Department of Media, Macquarie University)

Jennifer Corkin – "Meet the Burtons: The Celebrity Legacy of Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton"
(Department of Media, Macquarie University)